A Teaching (I) and (II)

“So many scholars read anxiously, with a hope not to learn, not to be discomposed by learning. They fish in indexes looking for confirmation of not being trumped, they skim the surface hoping that no phrase catches them. The aversion to an event to which one nonetheless comes — like the vague sadism that Adam Phillips describes as a quality of intellectuals who come to the world hoping once again to be disappointed — is a frustrating part of
being in this world.”

 

So begins a blog entry on the affective dimensions of scholarly reading, teaching and learning in ……. Supervalent Thought, University of Chicago English professor Lauren Berlant’s blog. 

Read the first entry here, and continued here.

 

Tavia Nyong'o

Tavia Nyong’o is a cultural critic and an Associate Professor in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. He writes on art, music, politics, culture, and theory. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. He is completing a study of fabulation in black aesthetics and embarking on another on queer wildness. Nyong’o has published in venues such as Radical History Review, Criticism, GLQ, TDR, Women & Performance, WSQ, The Nation, Triple Canopy, The New Inquiry, and n+1. He is co-editor of the journal Social Text and the Sexual Cultures book series at New York University press. He regularly blogs at Bully Bloggers.