Saying Her Name: What Monuments to Sojourner Truth Can Teach Us about Memorializing Black LivesFrances Cathryn

In Esopus, a small town in upstate New York, a monument dedicated to Sojourner Truth was erected in 2009 (fig. 1). Truth was born in the area then known as Swartekill, some time in 1797, and lived in bondage in … Continue reading "Saying Her Name: What Monuments to Sojourner Truth Can Teach Us about Memorializing Black Lives"

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Palestinian Liberation and the Limits of the Present: A Review of Greg Burris’s The Palestinian IdeaKarim Elhaies

In an attempt to shed new light on transnational solidarity, Greg Burris’s The Palestinian Idea: Film, Media, and the Radical Imagination (Temple UP, 2020) poses a question: How can we think of Palestinian (and Black) liberation when history repeats itself … Continue reading "Palestinian Liberation and the Limits of the Present: A Review of Greg Burris’s The Palestinian Idea"

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On Julie Beth Napolin’s The Fact of ResonanceAmber Jamilla Musser

In a moment when the voices of the oppressed are ringing out across the world, Julie Beth Napolin’s The Fact of Resonance brings us toward the literary beginnings of modernism so that we can learn to listen for difference, which … Continue reading "On Julie Beth Napolin’s The Fact of Resonance"

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The Politics of Aesthetics in Anticolonial Thought: A Review of Ricanness: Enduring Time in Anticolonial Performance by Sandra RuizJohn Andrews

Frankfurt School philosopher Herbert Marcuse observes that “Art breaks open a dimension inaccessible to other experience, a dimension in which human beings, nature, and things no longer stand under the law of the established reality principle” (72). This, in short, … Continue reading "The Politics of Aesthetics in Anticolonial Thought: A Review of Ricanness: Enduring Time in Anticolonial Performance by Sandra Ruiz"

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On Free Jazz CommunismGabriel Bristow

Jazz, declared saxophonist Archie Shepp in 1966, “is anti-war; it is opposed to [the war in] Vietnam; it is for Cuba; it is for the liberation of all people. That is the nature of jazz. That’s not far fetched. Why … Continue reading "On Free Jazz Communism"

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On Marquis Bey’s Anarcho-BlacknessAndrew Cutrone

Marquis Bey’s Anarcho-Blackness: Notes Toward a Black Anarchism (AK Press, 2020) is (a) concise, necessarily unsettling, Black anarchist work. Here, the propinquity between “Black” and “anarchist” may confuse the reader, as the Black radical tradition and anarchist politics are not … Continue reading "On Marquis Bey’s Anarcho-Blackness"

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EyelinesStephen Ira

When director Richard Williams set out to make Who Framed Roger Rabbit? in 1988, no one had really attempted anything like it before. Although, of course, people had. If you’re anything like me, for example, you remember the several extraneous … Continue reading "Eyelines"

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A Love StoryAsa Mendelsohn

My shoulders stiffen the first time I watch Southern Comfort (2001), the film Kate Davis made documenting the last year of Robert Eads’s life. I am aware of the eyes and bodies in attendance, late 2018. I notice my companions … Continue reading "A Love Story"

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