Is This What Democracy Looks Like?

 
Click here to read. This dossier takes its cue from one of the Occupy movement’s bedrock slogans, “This Is What Democracy Looks Like” (though this was first nurtured, as were many Occupy paradigms, tactics and customs, in the global justice movement that came of age in Seattle in 1999). This proud assertion, stiffened by populist certitudes about the 99% hyper-majority, exercised a clear appeal to protesters. It is self-congratulatory, confrontational, and also quite articulate as a political statement. Not everyone has to believe the slogan to chant it. But what if it were taken up as a more literal goal? What if the Occupy model of horizontalism were to be pushed into every venue of civil society, eventually supplanting the roots of our representative democracy system? Who would stand to gain and who would lose? How would our own institutions, organizations and networks be transformed in the process? The radical innocence of Occupy allowed such questions to be asked. After a year of operations, the record allows some provisional answers to be offered. Read MoreTable of Contents

     
  1. Introduction: Is This What Democracy Looks Like
    Cristina Beltrán, A.J. Bauer, Rana Jaleel, and Andrew Ross
  2. Their Fight Is Our Fight: Occupy Wall Street, the Arab Spring, and New Modes of Solidarity Today
    Anthony C. Alessandrini
  3. This is What Democracy Feels Like: Tea Parties, Occupations and the Crisis of State Legitimacy
    A.J. Bauer
  4. Occupy’s Alliance With Labor
    Suzanne Collado
  5. Occupy Wall Street and Consensus Decision Making: Historicizing the Preoccupation With Process
    Andrew Cornell
  6. A Queer Home in the Midst of a Movement? Occupy Homes, Occupy Homemaking
    Rana Jaleel
  7. For Democracy, Strike Debt: Resonances of Abolition in the Occupy Movement
    Nicholas Mirzoeff
  8. The Islamic Republic of Iran Loves OWS: Is This What Solidarity Looks Like?
    Manijeh Nasrabadi
  9. The Question of Infrastructure: An Interview with Michael Ralph
    A.J. Bauer
  10. Democracy and Debt
    Andrew Ross
  11. Policing Political Protest: Paradoxes of the Age of Austerity
    Stuart Schrader
  12. Not Your Academy: Occupation and the Futures of Student Struggles
    Zach Schwartz-Weinstein

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