Is This What Democracy Looks Like?

 
Click here to read. This dossier takes its cue from one of the Occupy movement’s bedrock slogans, “This Is What Democracy Looks Like” (though this was first nurtured, as were many Occupy paradigms, tactics and customs, in the global justice movement that came of age in Seattle in 1999). This proud assertion, stiffened by populist certitudes about the 99% hyper-majority, exercised a clear appeal to protesters. It is self-congratulatory, confrontational, and also quite articulate as a political statement. Not everyone has to believe the slogan to chant it. But what if it were taken up as a more literal goal? What if the Occupy model of horizontalism were to be pushed into every venue of civil society, eventually supplanting the roots of our representative democracy system? Who would stand to gain and who would lose? How would our own institutions, organizations and networks be transformed in the process? The radical innocence of Occupy allowed such questions to be asked. After a year of operations, the record allows some provisional answers to be offered. Read MoreTable of Contents

     
  1. Introduction: Is This What Democracy Looks Like
    Cristina Beltrán, A.J. Bauer, Rana Jaleel, and Andrew Ross
  2. Their Fight Is Our Fight: Occupy Wall Street, the Arab Spring, and New Modes of Solidarity Today
    Anthony C. Alessandrini
  3. This is What Democracy Feels Like: Tea Parties, Occupations and the Crisis of State Legitimacy
    A.J. Bauer
  4. Occupy’s Alliance With Labor
    Suzanne Collado
  5. Occupy Wall Street and Consensus Decision Making: Historicizing the Preoccupation With Process
    Andrew Cornell
  6. A Queer Home in the Midst of a Movement? Occupy Homes, Occupy Homemaking
    Rana Jaleel
  7. For Democracy, Strike Debt: Resonances of Abolition in the Occupy Movement
    Nicholas Mirzoeff
  8. The Islamic Republic of Iran Loves OWS: Is This What Solidarity Looks Like?
    Manijeh Nasrabadi
  9. The Question of Infrastructure: An Interview with Michael Ralph
    A.J. Bauer
  10. Democracy and Debt
    Andrew Ross
  11. Policing Political Protest: Paradoxes of the Age of Austerity
    Stuart Schrader
  12. Not Your Academy: Occupation and the Futures of Student Struggles
    Zach Schwartz-Weinstein

Related Posts

Social Networking and the Making of a Civil Rights Movement A rather peculiar reference to a prominent nineteenth century philosopher made Mir Hossein Mousavi's letter to Ayatollah Montazeri of some urgent interest.  More than three months into the post-electoral crisis of June 2009, the chief oppositional candidate, who had cried foul soon after the officia...
Andrew Ross speaks to Occupy Wall Street on Student Debt Introduction by Ashley Dawson:In 1970, an adviser to California Governor Ronald Reagan's reelection campaign commented on the state of public education: "We are in danger of producing an educated proletariat.  That's dynamite!  We have to be selective on who we allow to go through higher education....
Beyond Comprehension The catastrophe of January 12th is beyond human comprehension. In fact, it is beyond imagination, in the very precise sense that you cannot want to imagine it. But it is also produced as incomprehensible by the media: dead black bodies, wherever you look. People without names, without history, wit...
Working Lives in Debt   How does debt act as a tool of labor discipline? As a catalyst of capitalist accumulation? As a method of labor degradation? I want to approach these questions by imagining a series of three lives, working lives, working lives in debt. Though nominally fictional, this inter-generational stor...

Social Text Collective

Social Text is a journal.